resizing a vagrant box disk

[ I am about to do what others have done before me and blog about it one more time ]

While I do enjoy working with Windows 10, I am still not using WSL (waiting for WSL2) and work with either chocolatey or a vagrant Ubuntu box. It so happens that after pulling a few docker images the default 10G disk if full and you cannot work anymore. So, let’s resize the disk:

The disk on my ubuntu/bionic64 box, is a VMDK one. So before resizing, we need to transform it to a VDI first, which is easier for VirtualBox to handle:

VBoxManage clonehd .\ubuntu-bionic-18.04-cloudimg.vmdk .\ubuntu-bionic-18.04-cloudimg.vdi --format vdi

Now we can resize it, to say 20G:

VBoxManage modifymedium disk .\ubuntu-bionic-18.04-cloudimg.vdi --resize 20000

We’re almost there. We need to tell vagrant to boot from the VDI disk now. To do so open VirtualBox and visit the storage settings of the vagrant VM. Remove the VDMK disk(s) there and add the VDI on SCSI0 port. That’s it. We’re one step closer. Close VirtualBox and vagrant up now to boot from the VDI.

Now you have a 20G disk, but still a 10G partition. parted to the rescue:

$ sudo parted /dev/sda
(parted) resizepart 

It will ask you the partition number. You answer 1 (which is the /dev/sda1). It will ask you for the end of the partition. You answer -1 (which means until the end of disk). quit and you’re out.

You have changed the partition size, but still the filesystem reports the old size. resize2fs (assuming a compatible filesystem) and:

$ sudo resize2fs /dev/sda1

Now you’re done. You may want to vagrant reload to check whether everything works fine. Once you’re sure of that you can delete the old VMDK disk.

VMWare Fusion and Ubuntu

Ever since I got a Mac, I bought VMWare’s Fusion in order to be able to work with software that exists only in the Windows world. The really nice thing that good friend Moses pointed out yesterday, is that Fusion now supports easy installs for Ubuntu too! I had never took notice of that, since I run most of my VMs on VirtualBox.

I am an LXDE fan, so I first tried a Lubuntu install. It went fine, but it was not an Easy Install (in Fusion’s terminology). Then I went ahead and installed normal Ubuntu and afterwards (since I cannot do any real work with Unity) installed LXDE. The Easy Install went smooth and I did not need even need to consider keyboard configurations (something I had to do with Debian-LXDE and VirtualBox). I also changed the available RAM for the VM and now I have a machine that just works.

Oh the fun of using closed software in order to work easier with open source.