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Memory gets triggered in the most unexpected ways. I maintain a fairly large library of printed and electronic books (most of them DRMed -the light cases socially, kindle and Adobe locked the rest unfortunately) on subjects that interest me. It is fairly evident that I will not read them all, but I always have a book (and sometimes a paper) to recommend to a friend that has a problem. It seems that I am not the only one that thinks that personal libraries are supposed to be full of unread books.

Anyway, I was listening to Podcast.__init__ Episode 95 and one of the guests mentioned Parsing Techniques – A Practical Guide by Grune, I think it was when they touched Earley parsers and how most books about parsing do not really touch on how the actual parser is built. Wait a minute I’ve got that PDF! And you can go to the author’s site and download it. And you know what? There is a second edition out. For > 100 euros for a DRMed PDF I may not buy it since parsing is definitely not my thing, but somebody else out there might need the second edition. Judging from my skimming of the first edition, this is close to the encyclopaedia of parsing. I will go through some pages tonight.

Just for a refresher.

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Eight years ago I began a draft of this post with:

I (re)discovered this tutorial on Haskell and Hugs, while cleaning up some old (circa 2001) email.

And it just stayed there. Until tonight; my n-th restart on understanding Haskell. I may be late, but I do not quit.

Hugs reboot, 2017

Hugs reboot, 2017

Small Prolog

2016/12/11

A small post just to break the blog hiatus. Once upon a time there was a Prolog interpreter that was used in the Windows NT kernel. You can read about it here. The code is in the public domain and years ago I had downloaded from the net. It seems that it took me close to 8 years to put it on GitHub, for software archaeologists to dig into if they like.

https://github.com/a-yiorgos/smallprolog

 

APL

2016/11/13

Today it was my fourth (I believe) encounter with APL:

  • First, too many years ago when skimming through Tim Budd’s “The Kamin Interpreters in C++” (and the Kamin book afterwards). For the hardcore fans, Tim Budd has a book on implementing an APL compiler.
  • Next was a Dr Dobbs issue about the J programming language.
  • Some years a ago a comment on this blog about Dyalog.

Today it was Functional Geekery’s Episode 65 where I found out about the most interesting (to me) implementation of Conway’s Game of Life.

[ Mostly saving this post for posterity ]

I had heard of the language long before it was made Open Source. In order to get access to the implementation I had Timos Sellis sign an NDA with Ericsson. I had fun with Mnesia (the distributed DBMS) and started thinking of whether it could be applied to stuff I was good at at the time (namely SMTP and DNS). In fact it was. Because most of the Erlang team formed a company named Bluetail that was making software based load balancers with Erlang and got sold at $152M.

Nowadays I occasionally have “fun” with the Erlang VM whenever I have a RabbitMQ instance go mad.

But this? This is something only someone like the guy who writes RabbitMQ could discover:

Donald Knuth was the first Erlang programmer

The Expert Beginner

2016/06/12

I found out about the Expert Beginner book from Avdi Grimm’s newsletter. It is a small but discomforting book (a series of blog posts turned into a book) that I believe anyone in programming, systems administration or DevOps arena must devote some hours to read. Its basic premise is the following extension of the Dreyfus model:

The Expert Beginner trap

The Expert Beginner trap

While the book is a guide on how to spot and avoid Expert Beginners (people who believe they have mastered all there is to master in their field and anything beyond what they already know is useless), it also serves as a guide to spot when you start emitting Expert Beginner signals yourself.

Do yourself a favor and read the book. Especially if you consider yourself a guru, ninja or rockstar of something. It will only cost you two hours.

BlinkStick is a USB powered LED that can be driven via a simple API from a programming language like Python. Since the status of an ElasticSearch cluster can be determined using three colors (green, yellow, red) a BlinkStick can be a nice visual aid in your monitoring infrastructure.  An easy proof of concept is to use the BlinkStick Website API that allows, given a token, for the color of your BlinkStick to be set remotely by your monitoring system for example. You can find such a proof of concept here: https://github.com/a-yiorgos/elastic-blink

BlinkStick, soldered

BlinkStick, soldered

Of course if you want a more elaborate and secure setup, it is possible. I had my 15 minutes of fun. YMMV.