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addressing

2016/09/26

I’ve started reading John Day’s Patterns in Network Architecture and during the first pages it makes strong references to Saltzer’s 1982 paper. Why would I bring this up? Well, I just heard Surprisingly Awesome‘s episode on Postal codes where they deal with two countries (Lebanon and Mongolia) with almost non-existent addressing plans. Here is what an addressing plan should give you:

  • a name identifies what you want,
  • an address identifies where it is, and
  • a route identifies a way to get there

Day makes the case that we usually use that address of a network element in the same way that we use its name also which is an error, since by moving an element elsewhere in the network, we need to change its name also.  You on the other hand do not change your name when you change your home address. You used to change your phone number, but even that has become equally portable.

In places where no stable addressing system exists the courier is required to build a mental representation of the routes in their area of delivery, based on landmarks, trees, neon signs, whatever can help to make the delivery. In Mongolia this is solved differently: When something arrives at the post office, they call you back and you go and pick it up.

Enter the NAC. What is it exactly? It is an effort to map longitude and latitude to a more memorable representation using the base 30 number system using digits and capital letters. Borrowing from Wikipedia, the NAC for the centre of the city of Brussels is HBV6R RG77T. Compact, accurate, but not quite memorable.

what3words seems to be a service set to solve this since with their solution a unique combination of just 3 words identifies a 3m x 3m square anywhere on the planet. For example, roughly the same place as above is described as october.donor.outlined. I admit, this is much easier to type in a GPS (or tell Siri).

However, I am still surprised that nobody ever thought of using IPv6 for this (maybe somebody has? Please tell me). Given the abundance that the 128bits give us, we could have indexed every square meter on the surface of the planet and make it addressable. Oh, the directories we could have built on top of that. But I have no fear. It is quite probable that much of the inhabited First World’s surface will be pingable in the foreseeable future. The IoT will make sure of that.

 

So the following popped up in my mailbox:

It is nice and joyful to see your profile on https://github.com and i thought is beautiful to make you a friend,looking for a good friendship, mail me to my box, because i am not often here on xxx@yyy.zzz for more introduction and i will send you my picture.

I guess it was bound to happen. Anywhere you allow messaging to occur, spam will follow. I only wonder why it took so long to happen via a popular service like this.

Well here is one: Trying to deceive me. No I do not believe the error message returned from your remove.php:

There was an error processing your request; please manually send an email to with Unsubscribe as its subject

And you know why is that I do not believe you? Because I never subscribed via this email address.  In your newsletter you say you want to disrupt the industry (which industry you leave it vague). So far you’re only annoying.

Mike A posted today on mailop:

I have fought the “WINMAIL.DAT” problem in my day job, and won. One outside sender was sending to multiple recipients in our company; some of them got regular attachments, while others got WINMAIL.DAT files. It turned out to be a setting in individual addressbook entries at the sender’s end of things.

If it is not a disk (full) issue, you’re most likely out of memory (and swap space).

milter-greylist

2013/03/27

After years of using graymilter (with a series of local hacks) I switched to milter-greylist.

After it run for a few days:

# Summary: 149173 records, 137182 greylisted, 11991 whitelisted, 0 tarpitted

and with only a few tweaks in its configuration:

racl whitelist domain google.com
racl whitelist domain googlemail.com
racl whitelist domain gmail.com
racl whitelist domain yahoo.com
racl whitelist domain hotmail.com
racl whitelist domain live.com
racl whitelist domain outlook.com
racl whitelist domain amazon.com
racl whitelist domain ebay.com
#racl whitelist domain gr

racl greylist default

You can apt-get install milter-greylist (which makes maintenance through OS upgrades manageble) and it has all the features that I would love to add in my series of hacks to graymilter but never got around to doing so.

(previous)

Mark Reed Crispin, inventor of IMAP, passed away on Friday, December 28, 2012 at Martha and Mary Healthcare Services in Poulsbo Washington. He was born on July 19, 1956 in Camden New Jersey and was 56 years of age.

Very few people have (almost single handledly) designed protocols and implemented (free) software that has facilitated communication among millions of people. Mark was one of them and thanks to his monumental achievement of IMAP (and the fact that the Net cannot “forget” his posts on comp.mail.imap) he will always be remembered and always there to teach those who want to hear him.

As someone who has had the privilege to exchange personal emails with him, I am deeply saddened by his departure. I think he is the first of my email heroes that leaves.